Rumble With Red Panda
Open 2 Small
Leaflet

There is no sweeter way to spread the message of conservation than through chocolate!

The Yowie Surprise-Inside Chocolate stars the six Yowie characters in bright foil wrapping. Inside is a Yowie shaped chocolate surrounding a recyclable capsule with a collectable toy inside. 

Our chocolate is 100% natural milk chocolate made with sustainably sourced ingredients (Rainforest Alliance Certified), Non-GMO, Gluten-Free, Nut-Free and both Kosher & Halal Certified as well. 

And best of all, inside each chocolate character is a surprise, limited-edition, life like collectible animal (or a Yowie character) with a full color leaflet.

The leaflet features a picture of the real-life animal, its profile and level of endangerment.

View Collections View Rarity Chart
Yowie Scope

Keep track of your entire Yowie collection virtually, learn more about your collectible, and earn digital rewards by scanning your collectible with the free YowieScope app available on the AppStore and on Google Play!

YowieScope is the first collection app of its kind!  It combines AR (augmented reality) and the latest 3D scanning technology to create a virtual library of ALL the Yowie collectibles. 

Video the Tutorial Video here.

App Store
Goole Play

Wcs Series

Series 4

WCS Series

This Series is unprecedented and very meaningful to us. The Wildlife Conservation Society Series was created to help us all actively contribute to saving endangered species each and every time we buy a Yowie surprise-inside chocolate to enjoy the delicious, swiss-recipe milk chocolate and discover the surprise collectible within. For each chocolate sold in the USA from this Series, Yowie Group Ltd. will donate a portion of the net proceeds to WCS. Click HERE to learn more. The animals included in this special series are quite exotic and run across the range of “not threatened” to “extinct in the wild”. Our six Yowie friends are also prominently featured in this collection, each with a special addition inspired by the stories from their new books! We are actively looking to add the ability to purchase the Yowie books to our website, for the amazing North American and Australian Yowie fans, in the near future.

Download The Poster
Rumble

RUMBLE

The Redgum Yowie

Guardian of the Deserts and Plains. As the leader of the Yowie Pack, Rumble is an excitable, rough and tumble character. Cousin to the red kangaroo, Rumble is always ready to make a stand in defence of desert and plain. Inclined to be impatient, Rumble’s bark is far worse than its bite, and underneath there is a heart of gold.

Squish

SQUISH

The Fiddlewood Yowie

Guardian of the Waterways. Part playful platypus, Squish is as bubbly as a babbling brook, sparkling as a waterfall and contented as a slow flowing river. Protector of our waterways, Squish is always happy and energetic – the jester of the Yowie Pack and friend to all.

Ditty

DITTY

The Lillipilli Yowie

Guardian of the Woodlands and Meadows. Ditty is the poet of the Yowie Pack. In love with its habitat and its wildfolk, Ditty spends time foraging with cousin wombat chasing butterflies and conducting cicada and cricket concerts. Always on the lookout for trouble in the woodlands and meadows, Ditty is a determined protector of its habitat.

Boof

BOOF

The Bottlebrush Yowie

Guardian of the Rainforest and Mountains. Ruler of its vast habitat of rainforests and mountains, Boof is delightfully unpredictable and the ever-funny clown of the Yowie Tribe. So brim full of joy, Boof is inclined to be a little clumsy as it trips among tree roots and toadstools with cousin bandicoot. But Boof is always around when needed to help friends and wildfolk.

Crag

CRAG

The Mangrove Yowie

Guardian of the Marshland, Swamps and Backwaters. With a touch of cousin crocodile, Crag is the meanest looking of all the Yowie. But behind that crocodilical smile, there beats a heart of gold. Vigilant keeper of marsh, swamp and backwater, Crag leaves nothing to chance when it comes to defending its habitat and all its wet and muddy creatures.

Nap

NAP

The Honeygum Yowie

Guardian of the Treetops. Nap is the wise old Yowie of the Pack. Most at home among the tree tops with the kookaburra, the owl, and kinfolk the koala family Nap’s wisdom and understanding are always available. A tendency to doze off at any time at all, caressed in dreams by breeze and gum blossom, doesn’t stop Nap from being an alert and able guardian of its lofty habitat.

Bear

Andean Bear

(Tremarctos ornatus)

Looking smart

The Andean Bear is also known as the Spectacled Bear because its face markings make it look like it is wearing glasses or spectacles.

  • The only bear in South America, and found in the high Andes
  • The Andean bear is the only living short-faced bear
  • Although large, they are shy and often build platforms in trees which allow them to hide
Coral Reef Shark

Blue Shark

(Prionace glauca)

Sudden deep sea survival

The Blue Shark can be found off the coasts of every continent but Antarctica. It is a medium-sized shark species that can produce from 5 to 105 pups per litter. Once born, mother sharks leave their pups to survive on their own.

  • Shaded blue on top, and white on bottom, so they can’t be seen from above or below
  • Their favorite food is squid from the deep sea
Tortoise

Burmese Star Tortoise

(Geochelone platynota)

A star from Myanmar

The radiating star pattern of the Burmese Star Tortoise helps them hide in both the bamboo thickets and dry straw underbrush of Myanmar.

  • Driven to near extinction in the wild as they have been poached and sold mainly as pets
  • Approximately 14,000 are alive today due to intensive captive breeding efforts
Cheetah

Cheetah

(Acinonyx jubatus)

Spotted racer

The Cheetah is the fastest land mammal, known to run as fast as 61 miles per hour. There are currently only 8,000 known to be roaming in southwestern, eastern, and central Africa.

  • Their tails are flat and act like a boat rudder for fast turns and balance
  • Both their skin and fur are spotted
  • They are the only cat species with non-retractable claws, making them similar to dogs
Fosa

Fossa

(Cryptoprocta ferox)

Tall tales with long tails

The Fossa is the largest predator in Madagascar and they specialize in eating Lemurs. Mongooses are the closest relative to the Fossa.

  • The Fossa’s tail is almost as long as its body
  • They have very flexible ankles so they can climb trees easily
  • There are many village legends that make them a mysterious species
Alpaca

Guanaco

(Lama guanicoe)

Ears up, chilled out

Guanacos communicate in many different ways. Ears up means they are relaxed. Living in South America, Guanacos use their lips like fingers to pick up and draw food into their mouths, similar to other ungulate species.

  • Guanacos touch noses as a type of greeting. Another communication method is by spitting (up to 6 feet)
  • Strong swimmers and are comfortable standing in streams and rivers
Bluewhale

Humpback Whale

(Megaptera novaeangliae)

Singing stars of the sea

Among these giants of the ocean, the female is actually larger than the male and only the male sings. They learn different dialects of the whale song from their own local population, just like humans!

  • They eat about 1.5 tons of krill per day
  • Can measure up to 50 feet long and have tails 18 feet wide!
Dolphin

Irrawaddy Dolphin

(Orcaella brevirostris)

Not so nosey

These coastal and riverine dolphins live in ocean and freshwater inlets in Southeast Asia. They are found in mangroves, rivers, and lakes across much of the region, although these dolphins are now becoming increasingly rare.

  • Can be distinguished by their short noses and bulging foreheads
  • They can be trained to help fishers by surrounding schools of fish
Frog

Kihansi Spray Toad

(Nectophrynoides asperginis)

Small sizes small numbers

The Kihansi Spray Toad is endemic to a small area at the base of a waterfall near the Kihansi River in Tanzania. A captive breeding program has greatly increased their numbers and they are now being reintroduced into the wild.

  • Their bellies are transparent, making it possible to see their food and baby larvae
  • Known to play dead or eject water from their bladder if disturbed
Kipunji Monkey

Kipunji Monkey

(Rungwecebus kipunji)

21st century monkey

The Kipunji Monkey, which lives in the highland regions of Tanzania, is known for using its distinctive bark-honk call to communicate among its species.

  • The first monkey species to be assigned a new Genus since the 1920s
  • First spotted in 2003, the Kipunji was immediately known to be Africa’s rarest monkey
Lizard

Madagascar Day Gecko

(Phelsuma madagascariensis)

Basking in the sun

The Madagascar Day Gecko can often be found basking in the sun while hiding in the leaves and trees of the eastern coast of Madagascar. They are also the largest species of Gecko and can reach as long as 10 inches!

  • They have no eyelids, so they lick their eyes to keep them clean and moist
  • Their feet have multiple ridges and hairs that allow them to adhere to almost any surface
Mandril

Mandrill

(Mandrillus sphinx)

Social network primates

The Mandrill hangs out in huge groups as large as 600 to 1,500 individuals.

  • Found in the rain forests of Cameroon, Gabon, Congo, and Equatorial Guinea
  • World’s largest monkey
  • Stays on the ground during the day and sleeps in the trees at night
Okapi

Okapi

(Okapia johnstoni)

A giraffe in Zebra pants

Okapi are related to the Giraffe and they appear on the currency of the Democratic Republic of Congo — the only country they exist. Okapi have long tongues to help them remove leaves from trees.

  • Okapi live in dense jungles and eat up to 100 different plants, clay from the riverbanks, and charcoal from burnt trees
  • Baby Okapi don’t poop for over a month after birth
Tiger

Siberian (Amur) Tiger

(Panthera tigris altaica)

Largest living feline

The Amur Tiger lives primarily in Russia, where it has made a spectacular comeback since the 1930s, when the population fell as low as 20–30 animals.

  • Can be found in eastern Russia and northeastern China
  • The population is now estimated at 360 animals
  • Similar to human fingerprints, no two tigers have the same stripe patterns
Silky Sikifas

Silky Sifaka

(Propithecus candidus)

Angels of the forest

This beautiful, white Lemur is found in the northeastern part of Madagascar, with only about 250 alive in the wild today. They are nicknamed the ‘Angel of the Forest’ due to their creamy white fur.

  • Silky Sifakas have black or non-pigmented faces
  • Males have scent glands located in brown patches on their stomachs
Snowlepard

Snow Leopard

(Panthera unciaa)

Silent solitary snowy mountain cat

This big cat has a white coat with black spotted rosettes that helps it hide and allows it to hunt undetected. Scientists estimate that at least 4,000 snow leopards now live across the species’ mountainous range.

  • Snow Leopards purr, growl, and hiss, but they don’t roar like other big cats
  • Has a long, thick tail (1 meter) to help it balance while roaming around sheer mountain faces
Warlus

Southern Elephant Seal

(Mirounga leonina)

Largest coastline Carnivora

Living mostly in sub-Antarctic waters for more than 9 months a year, Southern Elephant Seals only come to land to breed or molt. This earless seal is the largest Carnivora species and can weigh up to 2,000 pounds!

  • Males are up to 4x larger than females and have elephant trunk-like noses
  • To win the attention of females, males fight in dramatic body-slamming battles
Bird

Sumatran Ground Cuckoo

(Carpococcyx viridis)

Elusive eight-decade disappearance

This beautiful ground-dwelling bird had not been seen for more than 81 years until 1997 when one was live trapped and released. Deforestation has been extensive on Indonesia’s island of Sumatra and is a main threat to this rare species.

  • Fewer than 10 birds have been discovered in the wild in the past century
Orangutan

Sumatran Orangutan

(Pongo abelii)

Tree-dwelling tool maker

Living only in northern Sumatra, Indonesia, these large animals spend almost all of their time in the trees, except for older males which spend significant time on the ground. The orangutan, Asia’s only great apes species, can live up to 60 years in the wild.

  • Can make and use tools for opening fruit or extracting insects
  • Adult males have wide cheek pads on their faces
Warthog

White-Lipped Peccary

(Tayassu pecari)

Funny facial hair

These white bearded and mustached mammals live in the dense mountain and lowland jungles of Central and South America, where they need large areas of healthy forests.

  • Can live in large herds of more than 300 animals
  • After being attacked by jaguars, peccaries have attacked them back
  • They tend to give birth to twins
Rescue Series

Series 3

Rescue Series

This series introduces you to the nemesis of our Yowie friends, the villains that Rumble, Squish, Ditty, Boof, Crag and Nap are always ready, willing and able to thwart in order to protect the habitats they watch over and the animals that depend on the preservation of those habitats to survive. We must always be vigilant of the threats posed by Gnash, Crusha, Oooze, Spark, Sludge and Crudd, otherwise known as the Grumkin! The Rescue Series also contains 3 extra-special collectibles featuring the Yowie Yurt and two of the Yowie rescue vehicles, the Yog and the Yopter! Did you know you can drive your very own Yopter in the Yowie Yopter game app?! Download the app now here: AppStore and Google Play. The animals in this collection are some of the most popular and favorite, those we all know, and yet, many are on the list of critically endangered animals including the Bactrian Camel, Orange-Bellied Parrot, Western Lowland Gorilla and Black Rhinoceros.

Download The Poster
Gnash

GNASH

The tiger-toothed tree-chomping Grumkin

Tiger-toothed tree-chompers just love chomping trees. Whenever they find a forest full of tall beautiful trees, they can’t wait to get their sharp teeth into a nice piece of wood, and chomp and chomp until there is nowhere left for the wild folk to live!

Crusha

CRUSHA

The mean earth-munching Grumkin

Crusha Grumkin like nothing better than to munch and crunch their way through the sand and soil. Often they are very careless about their munching and leave nothing behind them but a great big hole in the ground where the wild folk once lived.

Oooze

OOOZE

The murky oooze-making Grumkin

Oooze are without doubt the most dangerous of all Grumkin. They make it their special business to seek out fresh, sparkling rivers and streams to ooze into until everything is so murky and dark that no one can see and nothing can live there.

Spark

SPARK

The fiery flame-fanning Grumkin

Spark are very silly Grumkin. They don’t care at all about the terrible wood and tree fires they cause in the forests and they don’t stop to think about the wonderful things that grow there and the wild folk who live among the trees.

Sludge

SLUDGE

The smelly rotten-rubbish Grumkin

You can always tell where the smelly rotten-rubbish Grumkin have been. They like everything to be untidy and dirty and just can’t stand fresh air and beautiful places. In fact seeing everything just the way it ought to be makes them feel quite sick!

Crudd

CRUDD

The yukky mukky-poo Grumkin

Yukky mukky-poo Grumkin have a wonderful time messing up the water and mucking up the mud in our waterways and wetlands, dribbling and drooling all over the place. They slide over stones and slip over rocks until there is nowhere left for the frogs to play in the streams and waterways.

Yog

YOG

Powered by Yowie Magic

The Yog is the ideal vehicle for woodland travel. Pollution free, it’s so quiet you can still listen to the bees buzz or join in a cicada chorus.

Yopter

YOPTER

The ultimate in Yowie technology

The Yopter is made of cactus, bamboo and lashed together with desert grasses. The Yopter is perfect for a morning joyride – or a Grumkin spotting patrol.

Yurt

YURT

Cleverly constructed from red stone

The desert Yurt keeps Rumble cool on those blazing summer days – and warm on frosty winter nights.

Elephant

African Bush Elephant

(Loxodonta Africana)

Worlds largest land animal

You can tell an African elephant from an Asian elephant by its ears – they’re shaped like the African continent!

  • Lives in grasslands and woodlands of sub-Saharan Africa.
  • Eats up to 300 pounds (136 kg) of plant life each day – almost twice the weight of the average human adult.
  • Vulnerable due to habitat loss and ivory poaching for its tusks.
Camel

Bactrian Camel

(Camelus bactrianus)

Two-humped herbivore

The Bactrian camel handles its sandy environment with a third eyelid, long eyelashes, and nostrils that close during sandstorms.

  • Lives in grasslands and steppes of Central Asia.
  • Herbivorous, eating even the toughest plants and storing fat and water in its humps to survive long periods without supplies.
  • Critically endangered in the wild due to habitat loss.
Rhinoceros

Black Rhinoceros

(Diceros bicornis)

Horned high speed herbivore

The fastest rhino in the world, the black rhinoceros can reach 34 mph (55 km/h), as fast as a car driving through the city!

  • Lives in grasslands of eastern Africa.
  • Their dung has a unique smelly signature so they can tell whose poo is whose!
  • Feeds on leaves, branches and fruit of low bushes and shrubs.
  • Close to extinction due to widespread poaching for horns.
Goose

Blue-Winged Goose

(Cyanochen cyanoptera)

Silent night bird

The blue-winged goose differs from its relatives in a couple of important ways – it rarely flies, and it can’t honk.

  • Makes its home around high mountain lakes and rivers in Ethiopia.
  • Mainly herbivorous, grazing on grasses.
  • Vulnerable due to habitat loss.
  • A good flyer and swimmer but rarely does either, will run away if frightened.
Chimpanzee

Chimpanzee

(Pan troglodytes)

Smart, social & strong

Highly intelligent, the chimpanzee is one of the only animals that makes tools for finding food or using as weapons.

  • Found throughout the forests of Africa.
  • Lives in large community groups with complicated social systems.
  • Endangered due to habitat loss and poaching for meat.
  • Up to four times stronger than the average human.
Pangolin

Chinese Pangolin

(Manis pentadactyla)

Super scaly, super weird

This bizarre mammal resembles a scaly anteater, and defends itself by curling up into a ball.

  • Found in the forests of east Asia.
  • Hunts at night for insects, digging up ant and termite nests,capturing food with its 16' (40cm) long sticky tongue.
  • Critically endangered and near extinction from poaching for food.
Hippo

Hippopotamus

(Hippopotamus amphibious)

Built-in sunscreen

To protect its skin against the hot sun, the hippopotamus sweat glands secrete a red fluid that acts as a sunscreen.

  • Lives in the waterways of Africa.
  • Stays mainly in lakes and rivers during the day, heading for land at night to feed on grass.
  • Vulnerable from poaching and loss of habitat.
Lar Gibbon

Lar Gibbon

(Hylobates lar)

Loud strong swinger

Also known as the white-handed gibbon, this primate swings between branches using its powerful arms and hooked hands.

  • Found in the rainforests of southeast Asia.
  • Eats mainly fruit, but is very selective – will taste fruit for ripeness before eating.
  • Endangered from deforestation and the pet trade.
  • Every morning they send loud calls through the forest marking their territories.
Lion

Lion

(Panthera leo)

King of the jungle

If you shaved the fur off of a lion and a tiger, you wouldn’t be able to tell them apart – they’re very closely related.

  • Large, powerful cat found in grasslands and woodlands in sub-Saharan Africa and northwest India.
  • Apex predator – has no natural enemies in the wild.
  • Threatened by habitat loss and illegal hunting.
Numbat

Numbat

(Myrmecobius fasciatus)

A “bat” that can’t fly?

Don’t be fooled by the name – the numbat isn’t actually a bat, but a kind of marsupial.

  • Nests in hollow logs in the woodlands of southern and western Australia.
  • Feeds exclusively on termites, one of the few marsupials active during the day.
  • Endangered status due to being hunted by foxes.
  • Uses long snout and pointed tongue to eat around 20,000 termite per day.
Parrot

Orange-Bellied Parrot

(Neophema chrysogaster)

Australian parrot vacation

This woodland bird splits its time between two different residences– it has a summer home and a winter home!

  • Spends summer in Tasmania and in winter crosses Bass Strait to the mainland.
  • Feeds on grasses during the summer and fruits during the winter.
  • Critically endangered and close to extinction due to loss of habitat and introduced predators.
Red Panda

Red Panda

(Ailurus fulgens)

The other Chinese panda

Unrelated to the giant panda, this mammal sometimes acts like a housecat – it grooms itself after waking up or eating.

  • Lives in the mountains of southern Asia.
  • Much like the giant panda, mainly eats bamboo.
  • Vulnerable from hunting for fur, poaching for collectors and loss of habitat.
Hornbill

Southern Ground Hornbill

(Bucorvus leadbeateri)

Loud on the ground

If you ever get close to this bird, cover your ears – its loud call can be heard from over a mile away!

  • Lives in the grasslands of southern Africa.
  • Hunts on the ground for insects, reptiles and small mammals.
  • Threatened by habitat loss.
Chameleon

Strange-Horned Chameleon

(Kinyongia xenorhina)

A very accurate name

This reptile’s bizarre nose is made of two separate plates on its snout that meet at the end and form a horn.

  • Makes its home in the remote rainforests of central Africa.
  • Expert climber with prehensile tail and long claws.
  • Near threatened status due to logging and poaching for the pet trade.
Sun Bear

Sun Bear

(Helarctos malayanus)

Furry fun in the sun

Every sun bear has a unique patch of fur on its chest, usually yellow, orange or white, and sometimes spotted.

  • Resides in the forests of southeast Asia.
  • Eats mainly ants, termites and bees by tearing open nests and hives with its powerful claws.
  • Threatened by poaching and habitat loss.
Tasmanian Devil

Tasmanian Devil

(Ambystoma californiense)

Not just a cartoon

This marsupial may not look like the famous cartoon, but can fly into a screaming, teeth-baring rage when threatened.

  • Native to forests on the Australian island state of Tasmania.
  • Nocturnal – scavenges at night for birds, snakes, fish and insects.
  • Endangered and rapidly disappearing from deadly disease affecting only Tasmanian devils.
Gorilla

Western Lowland Gorilla

(Gorilla gorilla gorilla)

A powerful ape ape ape!

Gorilla groups are led by adult males called “silverbacks”. They weigh over 550 pounds (250 kg), as big as three adult humans.

  • Makes its home in the forests of western Africa.
  • Eats mostly fruit and leaves.
  • Critically endangered due to poaching and loss of forest habitat.
All American

Series 2

All Americas Series

This collection focuses on animals found in North, Central and South America as well as in the oceans that surround the Americas. It focuses more heavily on bringing attention to animals that are seriously threatened by the exponential amount of plastic entering ocean habitats, as well as fishing nets, boat collisions, the expanding loss of wild animal habitats from prairies to forests, and pollution. It also features two very special animals, the California Condor and the American Bald Eagle, that have been brought back from the brink of extinction through the efforts of people just like you! Along with the animals in this collection you can also find 6 new Yowie character collectibles featuring our ever-sassy guardians of the natural world, here to help us learn about the natural world around us.

Download The Poster
S2 1

RUMBLE

The Redgum Yowie

Guardian of the Deserts and Plains. As the leader of the Yowie Pack, Rumble is an excitable, rough and tumble character. Cousin to the red kangaroo, Rumble is always ready to make a stand in defence of desert and plain. Inclined to be impatient, Rumble’s bark is far worse than its bite, and underneath there is a heart of gold.

S2 5 02

SQUISH

The Fiddlewood Yowie

Guardian of the Waterways. Part playful platypus, Squish is as bubbly as a babbling brook, sparkling as a waterfall and contented as a slow flowing river. Protector of our waterways, Squish is always happy and energetic – the jester of the Yowie Pack and friend to all.

S2 6 02

DITTY

The Lillipilli Yowie

Guardian of the Woodlands and Meadows. Ditty is the poet of the Yowie Pack. In love with its habitat and its wildfolk, Ditty spends time foraging with cousin wombat chasing butterflies and conducting cicada and cricket concerts. Always on the lookout for trouble in the woodlands and meadows, Ditty is a determined protector of its habitat.

S2 2 02

BOOF

The Bottlebrush Yowie

Guardian of the Rainforest and Mountains. Ruler of its vast habitat of rainforests and mountains, Boof is delightfully unpredictable and the ever-funny clown of the Yowie Tribe. So brim full of joy, Boof is inclined to be a little clumsy as it trips among tree roots and toadstools with cousin bandicoot. But Boof is always around when needed to help friends and wildfolk.

S2 3 02

CRAG

The Mangrove Yowie

Guardian of the Marshland, Swamps and Backwaters. With a touch of cousin crocodile, Crag is the meanest looking of all the Yowie. But behind that crocodilical smile, there beats a heart of gold. Vigilant keeper of marsh, swamp and backwater, Crag leaves nothing to chance when it comes to defending its habitat and all its wet and muddy creatures.

S2 4 01

NAP

The Honeygum Yowie

Guardian of the Treetops. Nap is the wise old Yowie of the Pack. Most at home among the tree tops with the kookaburra, the owl, and kinfolk the koala family Nap’s wisdom and understanding are always available. A tendency to doze off at any time at all, caressed in dreams by breeze and gum blossom, doesn’t stop Nap from being an alert and able guardian of its lofty habitat.

S2 16 01

Leatherback Turtle

(Cyanochen cyanoptera)

Marathon swimmer

Can swim vast distances between feeding and breeding areas.
Capable of crossing the Pacific Ocean from the US to Southeast Asia.

  • Largest of all turtles, can grow to 10ft (3m) in length and weighs over 2000lb (900kg), the size of a small car.
  • Many die after eating plastic bags, mistaking them for jellyfish.
  • Found from the Arctic Circle to New Zealand.
S2 8 01

Attwater’s Prairie Chicken

(Tympanuchus cupido attwateri)

Boom-boom bird

During the breeding season, males put on spectacular displays, inflating their orange throat sacs and making loud booming calls.

  • Since 1900, population has dropped from about 1 million to a few hundred.
  • Threatened by loss of prairie habitat.
  • Now found only in two nature reserves in Texas.
S2 10 01

California Condor

(Gymnogyps californianus)

Back from the brink

Brought to the brink of extinction in the wild due to hunting and poisoning.
Population slowly growing after being reintroduced to former  habitats.

  • North America’s largest bird, with a wingspan up to 10ft (3m).
  • Soars up to 15,000ft (4500m) – ten times higher than the Empire State Building.
  • Native to California and Arizona.
S2 25

American Eagle

(Haliaeetus leucocephalus)

Symbolizing strength and freedom

Powerful symbol of liberty, the majestic Bald Eagle has been the national bird of the United States since 1782.

  • Large bird of prey unique to North America; wingspan up to 90 inches (230cm), wider than that of any Harlem Globetrotter.
  • Almost driven to extinction by pesticide use, now fully recovered and thriving.
S2 15 02

Ivory-billed Woodpecker

(Campephilus principalis)

Wanted alive!

There is a $50,000 reward for anyone who can lead scientists to a living Ivory-billed Woodpecker!

  • Uses its powerful bill to find grubs and small creatures in dead trees.
  • Threatened by clearing of forest habitat in southeastern USA.
  • Last confirmed sightings in the 1930s.
S2 22 01

Vaquita

(Phocoena sinus)

Extinction alert

Rapidly heading towards extinction. Each year many die after being accidentally caught in fishing nets.

  • World’s smallest porpoise – found only in Mexico’s Gulf of California.
  • At about four feet (140cm) in length, could fit into the average family bath tub.
  • World’s most endangered cetacean, with perhaps less than 100 surviving.
S2 17 01

Palila

(Loxioides bailleui)

Deadly dinner

Feeds mainly on the seeds of the endangered mamane tree, which are deadly to most animals.

  • Found only on the slopes of Mauna Kea volcano in Hawaii.
  • Lives at altitudes up to 9500ft (2900m), more than three times higher than the world's tallest building.
  • Threatened by clearing of native forest.
S2 9 01

Black-footed Ferret

(Mustela nigripes)

Super senses

Hunting in prairie dog burrows at night, relies on sharp hearing and powerful sense of smell to locate prey.

  • Stealthy nocturnal predator found on the Great Plains of North America.
  • Long, slender body and short powerful legs ideal for hunting in burrows.
  • Endangered by habitat loss and decline in prairie dog numbers.
S2 18 01

Jaguar

(Panthera onca)

Super cat!

An all-round animal athlete with enormous strength. Adept at climbing, crawling and swimming.

  • Stealthy, powerful predator found from US Southwest to Argentina
  • Largest cat in the Americas, capable of killing prey as big as anacondas
  • Usually spotted. Black specimens harder to find in the wild
  • Numbers declining due to habitat loss and illegal hunting.
S2 12 01

Devil’s Hole Pupfish

(Cyprinodon Diabolis)

Most endangered fish?

Found only in one geothermal pool in the Nevada desert. Possibly the world’s most endangered fish.

  • Less than one inch (25mm) long (shorter than a paperclip).
  • Breeds on a small rock ledge one foot (30cm) below the water surface.
  • Eats algae growing in the warm water.
S2 23 01

Florida Manatee

(Trichechus manatus latirostris)

Take a deep breath

With lungs about two thirds the length of its body, it can stay underwater for up to 20 minutes.

  • Marine mammal that feeds on sea grass in warm shallow waters around Florida
  • As big as a cow, weighing around 1200lb (500kg)
  • Threatened by pollution, collisions with boats and entanglement in fishing nets.
S2 13 01

Golden Lion Tamarin

(Leontopithecus rosalia)

Nature’s helper

Golden Lion Tamarins are critical to the health of their forest habitat, helping spread the seeds of many trees.

  • Small monkey found in coastal forests of south-eastern Brazil.
  • Only about 1000 left in the wild, restricted to small, isolated areas.
  • Highly vulnerable to predators, due to reduction in forest cover.
S2 19 02

Phantasmal Poison Frog

(Epipedobates tricolor)

Daddy day care

After breeding, the male takes care of the tadpoles, carrying them from place to place on his back.

  • Less than one inch (25 mm) long, the size of your little finger.
  • Brightly colored skin warns predators of its highly toxic compounds.
  • Deforestation rapidly destroying its threatened mountain forest habitat in Ecuador.
S2 14 02

Horned Guan

(Oreophasis derbianus)

True tree dweller

Rarely comes to the ground, and even drinks water that collects in plants growing among trees branches.

  • Turkey-sized bird found in mountain forests of Mexico and Guatemala.
  • Bony horn is covered with red skin, and grows longer as the bird matures.
  • Habitat rapidly disappearing as forest is cleared for agriculture.
S2 21 02

Utah Prairie Dog

(Cynomys parvidens)

Essential species

Provides habitat and food for other animals, making it a very important ‘essential species’.

  • Lives in large colonies with complex burrow systems for shelter and safety.
  • Lookouts stand guard around the colony, barking out warnings if predators approach.
  • Highly social mammal, native to Utah.
S2 7 02b

American Crocodile

(Crocodylus acutus)

Croc or Gator?

Although similar in looks to an alligator, it has a narrower snout, paler skin and prefers saltwater habitats from Florida to northern South America.

  • Grows to almost 20ft (6m) in length, longer than a minivan.
  • Can weigh more than 1000lb (450kg), heavier than five average adults.
  • Less aggressive than other crocs, attacks on humans very rare.
S2 11 02

California Tiger Salamander

(Ambystoma californiense)

Caution: Salamanders crossing

Many killed crossing roads while migrating from their burrows to winter breeding ponds.

  • Young hatch and grow in ponds, transforming from tadpoles into adults.
  • Wards off predators with bright yellow spots which indicate toxicity.
  • Native to California, USA.
S2 20 01

South American Tapir

(Tapirus terrestris)

Underwater walker

Superb swimmers and divers, they can walk underwater along river and lake beds, much like a hippopotamus.

  • Large mammal found near rivers and lakes in the Amazon basin.
  • Long flexible nose grabs food such as leaves, fruit and grass.
  • Can hold its breath underwater for up to three minutes to escape predators.
S2 24 02

Whale Shark

(Rhincodon typus)

Gentle giant

Despite its enormous size (as long as a city bus) it poses no danger to humans and even allows divers and snorkelers to swim alongside it.

  • World’s largest fish, grows to more than 40ft (12m) in length.
  • Threatened by humans fishing for meat, oil and skins.
  • Found in oceans in tropical climates.
Series 1 Header

Series 1

Premier Series

The Premier Series marks the relaunch of Yowie and celebrates the six Yowie themselves, Rumble, Squish, Ditty, Boof, Crag and Nap, along with animals from all seven continents on our amazing planet: Asia, Africa, North America, South America, Antartica, Europe and of course, Australia! The beautiful and interesting animals in this first comeback collection range from the Endangered to Not Threatened and are animals found across the range of habitats that our Yowie friends watch over and protect: deserts, grasslands, plains, mountains, forests, warm water oceans, tropics, rivers and streams and even the frozen tundra. This collection was created to celebrate the conservation of ALL of the habitats on our wonderous planet, and the animals that call those habitats home.

Download The Poster
S1 Premier Series (19)

RUMBLE

The Redgum Yowie

Guardian of the Deserts and Plains. As the leader of the Yowie Pack, Rumble is an excitable, rough and tumble character. Cousin to the red kangaroo, Rumble is always ready to make a stand in defence of desert and plain. Inclined to be impatient, Rumble’s bark is far worse than its bite, and underneath there is a heart of gold.

S1 Premier Series (24)

SQUISH

The Fiddlewood Yowie

Guardian of the Waterways. Part playful platypus, Squish is as bubbly as a babbling brook, sparkling as a waterfall and contented as a slow flowing river. Protector of our waterways, Squish is always happy and energetic – the jester of the Yowie Pack and friend to all.

S1 Premier Series (23)

DITTY

The Lillipilli Yowie

Guardian of the Woodlands and Meadows. Ditty is the poet of the Yowie Pack. In love with its habitat and its wildfolk, Ditty spends time foraging with cousin wombat chasing butterflies and conducting cicada and cricket concerts. Always on the lookout for trouble in the woodlands and meadows, Ditty is a determined protector of its habitat.

S1 Premier Series (21)

BOOF

The Bottlebrush Yowie

Guardian of the Rainforest and Mountains. Ruler of its vast habitat of rainforests and mountains, Boof is delightfully unpredictable and the ever-funny clown of the Yowie Tribe. So brim full of joy, Boof is inclined to be a little clumsy as it trips among tree roots and toadstools with cousin bandicoot. But Boof is always around when needed to help friends and wildfolk.

S1 Premier Series (22)

CRAG

The Mangrove Yowie

Guardian of the Marshland, Swamps and Backwaters. With a touch of cousin crocodile, Crag is the meanest looking of all the Yowie. But behind that crocodilical smile, there beats a heart of gold. Vigilant keeper of marsh, swamp and backwater, Crag leaves nothing to chance when it comes to defending its habitat and all its wet and muddy creatures.

S1 Premier Series (20)

NAP

The Honeygum Yowie

Guardian of the Treetops. Nap is the wise old Yowie of the Pack. Most at home among the tree tops with the kookaburra, the owl, and kinfolk the koala family Nap’s wisdom and understanding are always available. A tendency to doze off at any time at all, caressed in dreams by breeze and gum blossom, doesn’t stop Nap from being an alert and able guardian of its lofty habitat.

S1 Premier Series (17)

African Grass Owl

(Tyto capensis)

Found: Eastern Africa, from Ethiopia to South Africa. 
Eats: Mice, rats and other small animals.
Conservation: Under pressure in some areas from farming and urban development. Often hunts near roads, so many are killed at night by cars and trucks.
Species status: Not threatened.

A nocturnal hunter of open, grassy habitats, the African Grass Owl uses its superb eyesight and powerful hearing to zero in on its prey, even in total darkness. The front edges of its large wings are covered in soft, comb-like feathers, which enable air to pass over them with a minimum of noise. This makes the owl’s flight almost completely silent, allowing it to swoop down on prey without warning.

S1 Premier Series (18)

Alpaca

(Vicugna pacos)

Found: Andes Mountains of South America.
Eats: Grasses
Conservation: Widespread as a domestic animal
Species status: Not threatened.

Renowned for its luxuriously soft wool, the Alpaca exists today only as a domestic animal. It is descended from the closely related Vicuña, a wild mammal of the high Andes mountains. The people of the Andes domesticated these animals thousands of years ago, breeding them selectively for their fine fleece. The Alpaca is notorious for its habit of spitting when agitated. This usually happens during disputes between Alpacas, although humans can occasionally become targets.

S1 Premier Series (5)

American Bison

(Bison bison)

Found: The Great Plains of North America.
Eats: Grasses and other low plants.
Conservation: Protected in reserves and national parks, numbers are growing.
Species status: Near threatened.

Also known as buffalo, American Bison once roamed the grasslands of North America in their millions. Hunting in the 19th century almost drove the species to extinction. Bison are well adapted to the extreme climate of the Great Plains, growing a heavy winter coat, then shedding it as summer approaches. Powerful runners, they can reach speeds of 40mph (65km/h) when fleeing predators, especially Gray Wolves.

S1 Premier Series (6)

Brown Bear

(Ursus arctos)

Found: Parts of Europe and the Middle East, northern Asia, north-western North America.
Eats: Roots, berries, acorns, mushrooms, mammals, fish.
Conservation: In some areas under pressure from habitat loss and hunting. 
Species status: Not threatened.

Brown Bears are highly adaptable animals capable of living in a wide variety of habitats. Although they have a ferocious reputation, they feed mainly on plants. They are especially fond of roots, digging them out of the earth with their powerful claws. Brown Bears also eat meat, which they obtain by either hunting or, more often, scavenging. They can also catch fish, scooping them out of the water or grabbing them with their teeth.

S1 Premier Series (7)

Caracal

(Caracal caracal)

Range: Africa, Middle East, Central Asia, northern India.
Eats: Small mammals, birds
Conservation: Under pressure in some areas from habitat loss and hunting.
Species status: Not threatened.

The Caracal is a medium-sized wild cat, recognizable by long tufts of hair on its ears. Well adapted to
dry conditions, it can go for long periods without drinking water, surviving on the fluids it digests from its prey. The Caracal is an acrobatic hunter, able to leap more than six and a half feet (2m) into the air to snatch birds in flight. As well as the usual feline noises such as purrs and growls, Caracals also communicate with barking sounds.

S1 Premier Series (2)

Clownfish

(Amphiprion ocellaris)

Found: Warm waters of the Indian and Pacific Oceans.
Eats: Small crustaceans, worms, plankton, algae. 
Conservation: Targeted by poachers for the pet trade. Coral reef habitat vulnerable to pollution and climate change. 
Species status: Near threatened.

While most small fish avoid sea anemones, the Clownfish is perfectly at home among their stinging tentacles. A coating of mucus protects the fish from the anemone’s venom. The Clownfish lays its eggs within the security of the anemone’s tentacles. In return for its safe home the little Clownfish aggressively fights off other fish, often much larger than itself, which might try to nip off the anemone’s soft tentacles.

S1 Premier Series (8)

Emperor Penguin

(Aptenodytes forsteri)

Found: Coastal Antarctica and nearby waters.
Eats: Fish, krill, squid.
Conservation: Faces potential threats from habitat disturbance and loss of prey due to overfishing.
Species status: Near threatened.

Up to four feet (120cm) tall and weighing up to 100lb (45kg), the Emperor Penguin is the largest
of all penguins. To survive in the frigid Antarctic habitat it has a thick layer of fat, and the densest coat of feathers of any bird. During winter male and female take turns to incubate a single egg. The other mate makes the long journey across the ice from the breeding colony to the open sea to hunt, returning to share its catch.

S1 Premier Series (4)

European Rabbit

(Oryctolagus cuniculus)

Found: Native to Spain, Portugal and northwest Africa. Introduced to many other countries. 
Eats: Grass, roots, leaves. 
Conservation: In its native range vulnerable to disease and overhunting.
Species status: Near threatened.

European Rabbits live in groups sharing networks of burrows called ‘warrens’. They can be highly aggressive, their muscular back legs making powerful weapons. Fights between males can be especially vicious, often leading to injury or death. Females are fiercely protective of their young, and will fight tenaciously to defend them. European Rabbits are constantly alert for danger, as they are important prey for many predators.

S1 Premier Series (1)

Fennec Fox

(Vulpes zerda)

Found: Sahara Desert of North Africa.
Eats: Small mammals, birds, insects.
Conservation: Hunted in some areas for its fur.
Species status: Not threatened.

Only about the size of a house cat, the Fennec Fox is the smallest member of the dog family. It is superbly adapted to the searing heat of its desert habitat. Its paws are covered in thick fur, protecting them from hot sand. The distinctive large ears help to keep the animal cool, acting as radiators for the blood. They also give the Fennec Fox excellent hearing, allowing it to detect prey hiding under the sand.

S1 Premier Series (10)

Galapagos Tortoise

(Chelonoidis nigra)

Found: Galapagos Islands (part of Ecuador, South America). 
Eats: Grasses, fruit, berries, cacti. 
Conservation: Threatened by habitat damage and predation of eggs and young by feral animals. 
Species status: Vulnerable.

Galapagos Tortoises are the world’s largest species of tortoise, sometimes reaching six feet (1.83m) in length and weighing as much as 880lb (400kg). They are among the longest lived of all animals and have been known to live for over 170 years. Galapagos Tortoises are voracious feeders, eating up to 80lb (36kg) of vegetation each day when food is readily available. Yet they can survive for over a year without food or water, living on fat reserves.

S1 Premier Series (9)

Giant Anteater

(Myrmecophaga tridactyla)

Found: Central and South America, from Honduras to northern Argentina.
Eats: Ants, termites and their eggs and larvae.
Conservation: Threatened by hunting, wildfires and habitat loss for ranching.
Species status: Vulnerable.

The Giant Anteater is found in a range of habitats, from grassland to rainforest. It has poor eyesight, but an excellent sense of smell, which it uses to locate the nests of ants and termites. Once it finds a nest, the Giant Anteater uses its powerful claws to rip it open. It then probes inside the exposed nest with its snout, licking up the insects with a long, sticky tongue that can extend as far as two feet (60cm).

S1 Premier Series (11)

Giant Panda

(Ailuropoda melanoleuca)

Found: Mountain ranges in central China.
Eats: Bamboo shoots.
Conservation: Threatened by habitat loss and poaching for skins.
Species status: Endangered.

The Giant Panda is an endangered bear found in the misty hills and mountains of central China. Although classified as a carnivore, it feeds almost entirely on bamboo shoots, eating up to 30lb (14kg) each day. The Panda’s digestive system contains special microbes that enable it to extract energy and nutrients from the tough bamboo. Each front paw has a specially modified bone that acts as a thumb, allowing the Panda to grasp the bamboo as it eats.

S1 Premier Series (16)

Gray Wolf

(Canis lupus)

Found: Parts of Europe, the Middle East, Africa, Asia and North America. 
Eats:
 Mainly large mammals, also small mammals, birds, reptiles.
Conservation: In some areas under pressure from habitat loss and hunting. 
Species status: Not threatened.

The Gray Wolf is a highly intelligent, social animal that lives in family groups called packs. Pack members communicate through complex facial expressions, as well as a variety of sounds including their well-known howling. Gray Wolves have great stamina and hunt large prey by tiring it out in long chases that can go for many miles. In spite of their bad reputation, attacks by Gray Wolves on humans are rare, as they usually avoid contact with people.

S1 Premier Series (13)

North American Beaver

(Castor canadensis)

Found: Rivers and streams in North America. 
Eats: Leaves and inner bark of trees.
Conservation: Beaver dam building causes occasional conflict with humans, leading to beavers being removed or destroyed. 
Species status: Not threatened.

The North American Beaver is famous for its dam building. The pond formed by the dam provides the animal with a safe place to build its home, or ‘lodge’. It also allows the beaver to swim to nearby trees, its main food source. Beaver dams create an important habitat for fish, waterfowl, otters and other animals. Once trapped in the millions for their fur, North American Beavers are now protected and their numbers are increasing.

S1 Premier Series (14)

Platypus

(Ornithorhynchus anatinus)

Found: Streams and rivers of eastern Australia.
Eats: Crayfish, shrimp, worms, insect larvae.
Conservation: Locally vulnerable to habitat loss and pollution.
Species status: Not threatened.

With its duck-like bill and beaver-like tail, the Platypus is one of the strangest of all mammals. It is one of only three species of egg-laying mammals. The Platypus feeds entirely underwater, using its supersensitive bill to detect electrical signals given off by prey. It does not open its eyes underwater, relying entirely on its bill to navigate and hunt. The male has sharp, venomous spurs on its hind feet, making it one of the world’s few venomous mammals.

S1 Premier Series (3)

Polar Bear

(Ursus maritimus)

Found: Arctic regions.
Eats: Seals, walruses, small whales.
Conservation: Threatened by loss of Arctic sea ice due to climate change.
Species status: Vulnerable.

The Polar Bear is a powerful predator of the icy Arctic. It feeds mainly on seals, which it usually hunts by lying in wait next to their breathing holes. When a seal surfaces for air, the bear seizes the prey with its sharp claws and crushing teeth. Polar Bears are excellent swimmers, and have been known to cross more than 200 miles (320km) of open sea. A thick layer of blubber protects them from the frigid water.

S1 Premier Series (12)

Southern Hairy-nosed Wombat

(Lasiorhinus latifrons)

Found: Arid areas of southern Australia.
Eats: Grasses, leaves.
Conservation: In some areas under pressure from habitat loss and competition for food from livestock. 
Species status: Not threatened.

The Southern Hairy-nosed Wombat is a large burrowing marsupial with powerful legs and strong claws for digging. Southern Hairy-nosed Wombats live in burrows joined together to form colonies, each of which can house up to ten animals. These colonies are like rabbit warrens, with multiple entrances and underground sleeping chambers. In the heat of summer the wombats stay in the cool of their burrows during the day, emerging to feed as the sun goes down.

S1 Premier Series (15)

Red Kangaroo

(Macropus rufus)

Found: Inland Australia.
Eats: Grasses, other low plants.
Conservation: Subject to commercial hunting and competition for food from livestock.
Species status: Not threatened.

The Red Kangaroo is the world’s largest marsupial. Males can stand nearly six feet (1.83m) in height.
Females are smaller, and often have bluish fur, giving them the nickname ‘blue flyers’. The young, known as ‘joeys’, stay in the mother’s pouch for about six months before venturing out. The Red Kangaroo is well adapted to its hot, dry habitat, usually resting in the shade during the heat of the day and feeding after sunset.

Super Sries

Series 3

World Wildlife SUPER SERIES

As our Aussie fans will have gathered, this SUPER SERIES brings together a whopping 52 Yowie, villains, vehicles AND animals into one, gigantically amazing collectible series!This biggest-ever collection features the six beloved Yowie, each with a special addition inspired by the stories from their new books!(We are actively looking to add the ability to purchase the Yowie books to our website, for the amazing North American and Australian Yowie fans, in the near future.) Also included are the infamous Grumkin!But the Yowie are quick to jump out of their Yurt and into their Yog and Yopter vehicles, all 3 of which are now available as collectibles, to battle the Grumkin no matter where they turn up.The animals in this big and beautiful collection range from some of the most favorite, such as the Tasmanian Devil, Siberian Tiger and Humpback Whale to the most exotic, such as the Chinese Pangolin and the Sumatran Ground Cuckoo, both of which are near extinction.

Download The Poster
Rumble

RUMBLE

The Redgum Yowie

Guardian of the Deserts and Plains. As the leader of the Yowie Pack, Rumble is an excitable, rough and tumble character. Cousin to the red kangaroo, Rumble is always ready to make a stand in defence of desert and plain. Inclined to be impatient, Rumble’s bark is far worse than its bite, and underneath there is a heart of gold.

Squish

SQUISH

The Fiddlewood Yowie

Guardian of the Waterways. Part playful platypus, Squish is as bubbly as a babbling brook, sparkling as a waterfall and contented as a slow flowing river. Protector of our waterways, Squish is always happy and energetic – the jester of the Yowie Pack and friend to all.

Ditty

DITTY

The Lillipilli Yowie

Guardian of the Woodlands and Meadows. Ditty is the poet of the Yowie Pack. In love with its habitat and its wildfolk, Ditty spends time foraging with cousin wombat chasing butterflies and conducting cicada and cricket concerts. Always on the lookout for trouble in the woodlands and meadows, Ditty is a determined protector of its habitat.

Boof

BOOF

The Bottlebrush Yowie

Guardian of the Rainforest and Mountains. Ruler of its vast habitat of rainforests and mountains, Boof is delightfully unpredictable and the ever-funny clown of the Yowie Tribe. So brim full of joy, Boof is inclined to be a little clumsy as it trips among tree roots and toadstools with cousin bandicoot. But Boof is always around when needed to help friends and wildfolk.

Crag

CRAG

The Mangrove Yowie

Guardian of the Marshland, Swamps and Backwaters. With a touch of cousin crocodile, Crag is the meanest looking of all the Yowie. But behind that crocodilical smile, there beats a heart of gold. Vigilant keeper of marsh, swamp and backwater, Crag leaves nothing to chance when it comes to defending its habitat and all its wet and muddy creatures.

Nap

NAP

The Honeygum Yowie

Guardian of the Treetops. Nap is the wise old Yowie of the Pack. Most at home among the tree tops with the kookaburra, the owl, and kinfolk the koala family Nap’s wisdom and understanding are always available. A tendency to doze off at any time at all, caressed in dreams by breeze and gum blossom, doesn’t stop Nap from being an alert and able guardian of its lofty habitat.

Gnash

GNASH

The tiger-toothed tree-chomping Grumkin

Tiger-toothed tree-chompers just love chomping trees. Whenever they find a forest full of tall beautiful trees, they can’t wait to get their sharp teeth into a nice piece of wood, and chomp and chomp until there is nowhere left for the wild folk to live!

Crusha

CRUSHA

The mean earth-munching Grumkin

Crusha Grumkin like nothing better than to munch and crunch their way through the sand and soil. Often they are very careless about their munching and leave nothing behind them but a great big hole in the ground where the wild folk once lived.

Oooze

OOOZE

The murky oooze-making Grumkin

Oooze are without doubt the most dangerous of all Grumkin. They make it their special business to seek out fresh, sparkling rivers and streams to ooze into until everything is so murky and dark that no one can see and nothing can live there.

Spark

SPARK

The fiery flame-fanning Grumkin

Spark are very silly Grumkin. They don’t care at all about the terrible wood and tree fires they cause in the forests and they don’t stop to think about the wonderful things that grow there and the wild folk who live among the trees.

Sludge

SLUDGE

The smelly rotten-rubbish Grumkin

You can always tell where the smelly rotten-rubbish Grumkin have been. They like everything to be untidy and dirty and just can’t stand fresh air and beautiful places. In fact seeing everything just the way it ought to be makes them feel quite sick!

Crudd

CRUDD

The yukky mukky-poo Grumkin

Yukky mukky-poo Grumkin have a wonderful time messing up the water and mucking up the mud in our waterways and wetlands, dribbling and drooling all over the place. They slide over stones and slip over rocks until there is nowhere left for the frogs to play in the streams and waterways.

Yog

YOG

Powered by Yowie Magic

The Yog is the ideal vehicle for woodland travel. Pollution free, it’s so quiet you can still listen to the bees buzz or join in a cicada chorus.

Yopter

YOPTER

The ultimate in Yowie technology

The Yopter is made of cactus, bamboo and lashed together with desert grasses. The Yopter is perfect for a morning joyride – or a Grumkin spotting patrol.

Yurt

YURT

Cleverly constructed from red stone

The desert Yurt keeps Rumble cool on those blazing summer days – and warm on frosty winter nights.

Elephant

African Bush Elephant

(Loxodonta Africana)

Worlds largest land animal

You can tell an African elephant from an Asian elephant by its ears – they’re shaped like the African continent!

  • Lives in grasslands and woodlands of sub-Saharan Africa.
  • Eats up to 300 pounds (136 kg) of plant life each day – almost twice the weight of the average human adult.
  • Vulnerable due to habitat loss and ivory poaching for its tusks.
Bear

Andean Bear

(Tremarctos ornatus)

Looking smart

The Andean Bear is also known as the Spectacled Bear because its face markings make it look like it is wearing glasses or spectacles.

  • The only bear in South America, and found in the high Andes
  • The Andean bear is the only living short-faced bear
  • Although large, they are shy and often build platforms in trees which allow them to hide
Camel

Bactrian Camel

(Camelus bactrianus)

Two-humped herbivore

The Bactrian camel handles its sandy environment with a third eyelid, long eyelashes, and nostrils that close during sandstorms.

  • Lives in grasslands and steppes of Central Asia.
  • Herbivorous, eating even the toughest plants and storing fat and water in its humps to survive long periods without supplies.
  • Critically endangered in the wild due to habitat loss.
Rhinoceros

Black Rhinoceros

(Diceros bicornis)

Horned high speed herbivore

The fastest rhino in the world, the black rhinoceros can reach 34 mph (55 km/h), as fast as a car driving through the city!

  • Lives in grasslands of eastern Africa.
  • Their dung has a unique smelly signature so they can tell whose poo is whose!
  • Feeds on leaves, branches and fruit of low bushes and shrubs.
  • Close to extinction due to widespread poaching for horns.
Coral Reef Shark

Blue Shark

(Prionace glauca)

Sudden deep sea survival

The Blue Shark can be found off the coasts of every continent but Antarctica. It is a medium-sized shark species that can produce from 5 to 105 pups per litter. Once born, mother sharks leave their pups to survive on their own.

  • Shaded blue on top, and white on bottom, so they can’t be seen from above or below
  • Their favorite food is squid from the deep sea
Goose

Blue-Winged Goose

(Cyanochen cyanoptera)

Silent night bird

The blue-winged goose differs from its relatives in a couple of important ways – it rarely flies, and it can’t honk.

  • Makes its home around high mountain lakes and rivers in Ethiopia.
  • Mainly herbivorous, grazing on grasses.
  • Vulnerable due to habitat loss.
  • A good flyer and swimmer but rarely does either, will run away if frightened.
Tortoise

Burmese Star Tortoise

(Geochelone platynota)

A star from Myanmar

The radiating star pattern of the Burmese Star Tortoise helps them hide in both the bamboo thickets and dry straw underbrush of Myanmar.

  • Driven to near extinction in the wild as they have been poached and sold mainly as pets
  • Approximately 14,000 are alive today due to intensive captive breeding efforts
Cheetah

Cheetah

(Acinonyx jubatus)

Spotted racer

The Cheetah is the fastest land mammal, known to run as fast as 61 miles per hour. There are currently only 8,000 known to be roaming in southwestern, eastern, and central Africa.

  • Their tails are flat and act like a boat rudder for fast turns and balance
  • Both their skin and fur are spotted
  • They are the only cat species with non-retractable claws, making them similar to dogs
Chimpanzee

Chimpanzee

(Pan troglodytes)

Smart, social & strong

Highly intelligent, the chimpanzee is one of the only animals that makes tools for finding food or using as weapons.

  • Found throughout the forests of Africa.
  • Lives in large community groups with complicated social systems.
  • Endangered due to habitat loss and poaching for meat.
  • Up to four times stronger than the average human.
Pangolin

Chinese Pangolin

(Manis pentadactyla)

Super scaly, super weird

This bizarre mammal resembles a scaly anteater, and defends itself by curling up into a ball.

  • Found in the forests of east Asia.
  • Hunts at night for insects, digging up ant and termite nests,capturing food with its 16' (40cm) long sticky tongue.
  • Critically endangered and near extinction from poaching for food.
Fosa

Fossa

(Cryptoprocta ferox)

Tall tales with long tails

The Fossa is the largest predator in Madagascar and they specialize in eating Lemurs. Mongooses are the closest relative to the Fossa.

  • The Fossa’s tail is almost as long as its body
  • They have very flexible ankles so they can climb trees easily
  • There are many village legends that make them a mysterious species
Alpaca

Guanaco

(Lama guanicoe)

Ears up, chilled out

Guanacos communicate in many different ways. Ears up means they are relaxed. Living in South America, Guanacos use their lips like fingers to pick up and draw food into their mouths, similar to other ungulate species.

  • Guanacos touch noses as a type of greeting. Another communication method is by spitting (up to 6 feet)
  • Strong swimmers and are comfortable standing in streams and rivers
Hippo

Hippopotamus

(Hippopotamus amphibious)

Built-in sunscreen

To protect its skin against the hot sun, the hippopotamus sweat glands secrete a red fluid that acts as a sunscreen.

  • Lives in the waterways of Africa.
  • Stays mainly in lakes and rivers during the day, heading for land at night to feed on grass.
  • Vulnerable from poaching and loss of habitat.
Bluewhale

Humpback Whale

(Megaptera novaeangliae)

Singing stars of the sea

Among these giants of the ocean, the female is actually larger than the male and only the male sings. They learn different dialects of the whale song from their own local population, just like humans!

  • They eat about 1.5 tons of krill per day
  • Can measure up to 50 feet long and have tails 18 feet wide!
Dolphin

Irrawaddy Dolphin

(Orcaella brevirostris)

Not so nosey

These coastal and riverine dolphins live in ocean and freshwater inlets in Southeast Asia. They are found in mangroves, rivers, and lakes across much of the region, although these dolphins are now becoming increasingly rare.

  • Can be distinguished by their short noses and bulging foreheads
  • They can be trained to help fishers by surrounding schools of fish
Frog

Kihansi Spray Toad

(Nectophrynoides asperginis)

Small sizes small numbers

The Kihansi Spray Toad is endemic to a small area at the base of a waterfall near the Kihansi River in Tanzania. A captive breeding program has greatly increased their numbers and they are now being reintroduced into the wild.

  • Their bellies are transparent, making it possible to see their food and baby larvae
  • Known to play dead or eject water from their bladder if disturbed
Kipunji Monkey

Kipunji Monkey

(Rungwecebus kipunji)

21st century monkey

The Kipunji Monkey, which lives in the highland regions of Tanzania, is known for using its distinctive bark-honk call to communicate among its species.

  • The first monkey species to be assigned a new Genus since the 1920s
  • First spotted in 2003, the Kipunji was immediately known to be Africa’s rarest monkey
Lar Gibbon

Lar Gibbon

(Hylobates lar)

Loud strong swinger

Also known as the white-handed gibbon, this primate swings between branches using its powerful arms and hooked hands.

  • Found in the rainforests of southeast Asia.
  • Eats mainly fruit, but is very selective – will taste fruit for ripeness before eating.
  • Endangered from deforestation and the pet trade.
  • Every morning they send loud calls through the forest marking their territories.
Lion

Lion

(Panthera leo)

King of the jungle

If you shaved the fur off of a lion and a tiger, you wouldn’t be able to tell them apart – they’re very closely related.

  • Large, powerful cat found in grasslands and woodlands in sub-Saharan Africa and northwest India.
  • Apex predator – has no natural enemies in the wild.
  • Threatened by habitat loss and illegal hunting.
Lizard

Madagascar Day Gecko

(Phelsuma madagascariensis)

Basking in the sun

The Madagascar Day Gecko can often be found basking in the sun while hiding in the leaves and trees of the eastern coast of Madagascar. They are also the largest species of Gecko and can reach as long as 10 inches!

  • They have no eyelids, so they lick their eyes to keep them clean and moist
  • Their feet have multiple ridges and hairs that allow them to adhere to almost any surface
Mandril

Mandrill

(Mandrillus sphinx)

Social network primates

The Mandrill hangs out in huge groups as large as 600 to 1,500 individuals.

  • Found in the rain forests of Cameroon, Gabon, Congo, and Equatorial Guinea
  • World’s largest monkey
  • Stays on the ground during the day and sleeps in the trees at night
Numbat

Numbat

(Myrmecobius fasciatus)

A “bat” that can’t fly?

Don’t be fooled by the name – the numbat isn’t actually a bat, but a kind of marsupial.

  • Nests in hollow logs in the woodlands of southern and western Australia.
  • Feeds exclusively on termites, one of the few marsupials active during the day.
  • Endangered status due to being hunted by foxes.
  • Uses long snout and pointed tongue to eat around 20,000 termite per day.
Okapi

Okapi

(Okapia johnstoni)

A giraffe in Zebra pants

Okapi are related to the Giraffe and they appear on the currency of the Democratic Republic of Congo — the only country they exist. Okapi have long tongues to help them remove leaves from trees.

  • Okapi live in dense jungles and eat up to 100 different plants, clay from the riverbanks, and charcoal from burnt trees
  • Baby Okapi don’t poop for over a month after birth
Parrot

Orange-Bellied Parrot

(Neophema chrysogaster)

Australian parrot vacation

This woodland bird splits its time between two different residences– it has a summer home and a winter home!

  • Spends summer in Tasmania and in winter crosses Bass Strait to the mainland.
  • Feeds on grasses during the summer and fruits during the winter.
  • Critically endangered and close to extinction due to loss of habitat and introduced predators.
Red Panda

Red Panda

(Ailurus fulgens)

The other Chinese panda

Unrelated to the giant panda, this mammal sometimes acts like a housecat – it grooms itself after waking up or eating.

  • Lives in the mountains of southern Asia.
  • Much like the giant panda, mainly eats bamboo.
  • Vulnerable from hunting for fur, poaching for collectors and loss of habitat.
Tiger

Siberian (Amur) Tiger

(Panthera tigris altaica)

Largest living feline

The Amur Tiger lives primarily in Russia, where it has made a spectacular comeback since the 1930s, when the population fell as low as 20–30 animals.

  • Can be found in eastern Russia and northeastern China
  • The population is now estimated at 360 animals
  • Similar to human fingerprints, no two tigers have the same stripe patterns
Silky Sikifas

Silky Sifaka

(Propithecus candidus)

Angels of the forest

This beautiful, white Lemur is found in the northeastern part of Madagascar, with only about 250 alive in the wild today. They are nicknamed the ‘Angel of the Forest’ due to their creamy white fur.

  • Silky Sifakas have black or non-pigmented faces
  • Males have scent glands located in brown patches on their stomachs
Snowlepard

Snow Leopard

(Panthera unciaa)

Silent solitary snowy mountain cat

This big cat has a white coat with black spotted rosettes that helps it hide and allows it to hunt undetected. Scientists estimate that at least 4,000 snow leopards now live across the species’ mountainous range.

  • Snow Leopards purr, growl, and hiss, but they don’t roar like other big cats
  • Has a long, thick tail (1 meter) to help it balance while roaming around sheer mountain faces
Warlus

Southern Elephant Seal

(Mirounga leonina)

Largest coastline Carnivora

Living mostly in sub-Antarctic waters for more than 9 months a year, Southern Elephant Seals only come to land to breed or molt. This earless seal is the largest Carnivora species and can weigh up to 2,000 pounds!

  • Males are up to 4x larger than females and have elephant trunk-like noses
  • To win the attention of females, males fight in dramatic body-slamming battles
Hornbill

Southern Ground Hornbill

(Bucorvus leadbeateri)

Loud on the ground

If you ever get close to this bird, cover your ears – its loud call can be heard from over a mile away!

  • Lives in the grasslands of southern Africa.
  • Hunts on the ground for insects, reptiles and small mammals.
  • Threatened by habitat loss.
Chameleon

Strange-Horned Chameleon

(Kinyongia xenorhina)

A very accurate name

This reptile’s bizarre nose is made of two separate plates on its snout that meet at the end and form a horn.

  • Makes its home in the remote rainforests of central Africa.
  • Expert climber with prehensile tail and long claws.
  • Near threatened status due to logging and poaching for the pet trade.
Bird

Sumatran Ground Cuckoo

(Carpococcyx viridis)

Elusive eight-decade disappearance

This beautiful ground-dwelling bird had not been seen for more than 81 years until 1997 when one was live trapped and released. Deforestation has been extensive on Indonesia’s island of Sumatra and is a main threat to this rare species.

  • Fewer than 10 birds have been discovered in the wild in the past century
Orangutan

Sumatran Orangutan

(Pongo abelii)

Tree-dwelling tool maker

Living only in northern Sumatra, Indonesia, these large animals spend almost all of their time in the trees, except for older males which spend significant time on the ground. The orangutan, Asia’s only great apes species, can live up to 60 years in the wild.

  • Can make and use tools for opening fruit or extracting insects
  • Adult males have wide cheek pads on their faces
Sun Bear

Sun Bear

(Helarctos malayanus)

Furry fun in the sun

Every sun bear has a unique patch of fur on its chest, usually yellow, orange or white, and sometimes spotted.

  • Resides in the forests of southeast Asia.
  • Eats mainly ants, termites and bees by tearing open nests and hives with its powerful claws.
  • Threatened by poaching and habitat loss.
Tasmanian Devil

Tasmanian Devil

(Ambystoma californiense)

Not just a cartoon

This marsupial may not look like the famous cartoon, but can fly into a screaming, teeth-baring rage when threatened.

  • Native to forests on the Australian island state of Tasmania.
  • Nocturnal – scavenges at night for birds, snakes, fish and insects.
  • Endangered and rapidly disappearing from deadly disease affecting only Tasmanian devils.
Gorilla

Western Lowland Gorilla

(Gorilla gorilla gorilla)

A powerful ape ape ape!

Gorilla groups are led by adult males called “silverbacks”. They weigh over 550 pounds (250 kg), as big as three adult humans.

  • Makes its home in the forests of western Africa.
  • Eats mostly fruit and leaves.
  • Critically endangered due to poaching and loss of forest habitat.
Warthog

White-Lipped Peccary

(Tayassu pecari)

Funny facial hair

These white bearded and mustached mammals live in the dense mountain and lowland jungles of Central and South America, where they need large areas of healthy forests.

  • Can live in large herds of more than 300 animals
  • After being attacked by jaguars, peccaries have attacked them back
  • They tend to give birth to twins
Ranger

Series 2

Ranger Series

This collection focuses on animals found in North, Central and South America as well as in the oceans that surround the Americas.It focuses more heavily on bringing attention to animals that are seriously threatened by the exponential amount of plastic entering ocean habitats, as well as fishing nets, boat collisions, the expanding loss of wild animal habitats from prairies to forests, and pollution.It also features two very special animals, the California Condor and the American Bald Eagle, that have been brought back from the brink of extinction through the efforts of people just like you!Along with the animals in this collection you can also find 6 new Yowie character collectibles featuring our ever-sassy guardians of the natural world, here to help us learn about the natural world around us.

Download The Poster
S2 1

RUMBLE

The Redgum Yowie

Guardian of the Deserts and Plains. As the leader of the Yowie Pack, Rumble is an excitable, rough and tumble character. Cousin to the red kangaroo, Rumble is always ready to make a stand in defence of desert and plain. Inclined to be impatient, Rumble’s bark is far worse than its bite, and underneath there is a heart of gold.

S2 5 02

SQUISH

The Fiddlewood Yowie

Guardian of the Waterways. Part playful platypus, Squish is as bubbly as a babbling brook, sparkling as a waterfall and contented as a slow flowing river. Protector of our waterways, Squish is always happy and energetic – the jester of the Yowie Pack and friend to all.

S2 6 02

DITTY

The Lillipilli Yowie

Guardian of the Woodlands and Meadows. Ditty is the poet of the Yowie Pack. In love with its habitat and its wildfolk, Ditty spends time foraging with cousin wombat chasing butterflies and conducting cicada and cricket concerts. Always on the lookout for trouble in the woodlands and meadows, Ditty is a determined protector of its habitat.

S2 2 02

BOOF

The Bottlebrush Yowie

Guardian of the Rainforest and Mountains. Ruler of its vast habitat of rainforests and mountains, Boof is delightfully unpredictable and the ever-funny clown of the Yowie Tribe. So brim full of joy, Boof is inclined to be a little clumsy as it trips among tree roots and toadstools with cousin bandicoot. But Boof is always around when needed to help friends and wildfolk.

S2 3 02

CRAG

The Mangrove Yowie

Guardian of the Marshland, Swamps and Backwaters. With a touch of cousin crocodile, Crag is the meanest looking of all the Yowie. But behind that crocodilical smile, there beats a heart of gold. Vigilant keeper of marsh, swamp and backwater, Crag leaves nothing to chance when it comes to defending its habitat and all its wet and muddy creatures.

S2 4 01

NAP

The Honeygum Yowie

Guardian of the Treetops. Nap is the wise old Yowie of the Pack. Most at home among the tree tops with the kookaburra, the owl, and kinfolk the koala family Nap’s wisdom and understanding are always available. A tendency to doze off at any time at all, caressed in dreams by breeze and gum blossom, doesn’t stop Nap from being an alert and able guardian of its lofty habitat.

S2 16 01

Leatherback Turtle

(Cyanochen cyanoptera)

Marathon swimmer

Can swim vast distances between feeding and breeding areas.
Capable of crossing the Pacific Ocean from the US to Southeast Asia.

  • Largest of all turtles, can grow to 10ft (3m) in length and weighs over 2000lb (900kg), the size of a small car.
  • Many die after eating plastic bags, mistaking them for jellyfish.
  • Found from the Arctic Circle to New Zealand.
S2 8 01

Attwater’s Prairie Chicken

(Tympanuchus cupido attwateri)

Boom-boom bird

During the breeding season, males put on spectacular displays, inflating their orange throat sacs and making loud booming calls.

  • Since 1900, population has dropped from about 1 million to a few hundred.
  • Threatened by loss of prairie habitat.
  • Now found only in two nature reserves in Texas.
S2 10 01

California Condor

(Gymnogyps californianus)

Back from the brink

Brought to the brink of extinction in the wild due to hunting and poisoning.
Population slowly growing after being reintroduced to former  habitats.

  • North America’s largest bird, with a wingspan up to 10ft (3m).
  • Soars up to 15,000ft (4500m) – ten times higher than the Empire State Building.
  • Native to California and Arizona.
S2 25

American Eagle

(Haliaeetus leucocephalus)

Symbolizing strength and freedom

Powerful symbol of liberty, the majestic Bald Eagle has been the national bird of the United States since 1782.

  • Large bird of prey unique to North America; wingspan up to 90 inches (230cm), wider than that of any Harlem Globetrotter.
  • Almost driven to extinction by pesticide use, now fully recovered and thriving.
S2 15 02

Ivory-billed Woodpecker

(Campephilus principalis)

Wanted alive!

There is a $50,000 reward for anyone who can lead scientists to a living Ivory-billed Woodpecker!

  • Uses its powerful bill to find grubs and small creatures in dead trees.
  • Threatened by clearing of forest habitat in southeastern USA.
  • Last confirmed sightings in the 1930s.
S2 22 01

Vaquita

(Phocoena sinus)

Extinction alert

Rapidly heading towards extinction. Each year many die after being accidentally caught in fishing nets.

  • World’s smallest porpoise – found only in Mexico’s Gulf of California.
  • At about four feet (140cm) in length, could fit into the average family bath tub.
  • World’s most endangered cetacean, with perhaps less than 100 surviving.
S2 17 01

Palila

(Loxioides bailleui)

Deadly dinner

Feeds mainly on the seeds of the endangered mamane tree, which are deadly to most animals.

  • Found only on the slopes of Mauna Kea volcano in Hawaii.
  • Lives at altitudes up to 9500ft (2900m), more than three times higher than the world's tallest building.
  • Threatened by clearing of native forest.
S2 9 01

Black-footed Ferret

(Mustela nigripes)

Super senses

Hunting in prairie dog burrows at night, relies on sharp hearing and powerful sense of smell to locate prey.

  • Stealthy nocturnal predator found on the Great Plains of North America.
  • Long, slender body and short powerful legs ideal for hunting in burrows.
  • Endangered by habitat loss and decline in prairie dog numbers.
S2 18 01

Jaguar

(Panthera onca)

Super cat!

An all-round animal athlete with enormous strength. Adept at climbing, crawling and swimming.

  • Stealthy, powerful predator found from US Southwest to Argentina
  • Largest cat in the Americas, capable of killing prey as big as anacondas
  • Usually spotted. Black specimens harder to find in the wild
  • Numbers declining due to habitat loss and illegal hunting.
S2 12 01

Devil’s Hole Pupfish

(Cyprinodon Diabolis)

Most endangered fish?

Found only in one geothermal pool in the Nevada desert. Possibly the world’s most endangered fish.

  • Less than one inch (25mm) long (shorter than a paperclip).
  • Breeds on a small rock ledge one foot (30cm) below the water surface.
  • Eats algae growing in the warm water.
S2 23 01

Florida Manatee

(Trichechus manatus latirostris)

Take a deep breath

With lungs about two thirds the length of its body, it can stay underwater for up to 20 minutes.

  • Marine mammal that feeds on sea grass in warm shallow waters around Florida
  • As big as a cow, weighing around 1200lb (500kg)
  • Threatened by pollution, collisions with boats and entanglement in fishing nets.
S2 13 01

Golden Lion Tamarin

(Leontopithecus rosalia)

Nature’s helper

Golden Lion Tamarins are critical to the health of their forest habitat, helping spread the seeds of many trees.

  • Small monkey found in coastal forests of south-eastern Brazil.
  • Only about 1000 left in the wild, restricted to small, isolated areas.
  • Highly vulnerable to predators, due to reduction in forest cover.
S2 19 02

Phantasmal Poison Frog

(Epipedobates tricolor)

Daddy day care

After breeding, the male takes care of the tadpoles, carrying them from place to place on his back.

  • Less than one inch (25 mm) long, the size of your little finger.
  • Brightly colored skin warns predators of its highly toxic compounds.
  • Deforestation rapidly destroying its threatened mountain forest habitat in Ecuador.
S2 14 02

Horned Guan

(Oreophasis derbianus)

True tree dweller

Rarely comes to the ground, and even drinks water that collects in plants growing among trees branches.

  • Turkey-sized bird found in mountain forests of Mexico and Guatemala.
  • Bony horn is covered with red skin, and grows longer as the bird matures.
  • Habitat rapidly disappearing as forest is cleared for agriculture.
S2 21 02

Utah Prairie Dog

(Cynomys parvidens)

Essential species

Provides habitat and food for other animals, making it a very important ‘essential species’.

  • Lives in large colonies with complex burrow systems for shelter and safety.
  • Lookouts stand guard around the colony, barking out warnings if predators approach.
  • Highly social mammal, native to Utah.
S2 7 02b

American Crocodile

(Crocodylus acutus)

Croc or Gator?

Although similar in looks to an alligator, it has a narrower snout, paler skin and prefers saltwater habitats from Florida to northern South America.

  • Grows to almost 20ft (6m) in length, longer than a minivan.
  • Can weigh more than 1000lb (450kg), heavier than five average adults.
  • Less aggressive than other crocs, attacks on humans very rare.
S2 11 02

California Tiger Salamander

(Ambystoma californiense)

Caution: Salamanders crossing

Many killed crossing roads while migrating from their burrows to winter breeding ponds.

  • Young hatch and grow in ponds, transforming from tadpoles into adults.
  • Wards off predators with bright yellow spots which indicate toxicity.
  • Native to California, USA.
S2 20 01

South American Tapir

(Tapirus terrestris)

Underwater walker

Superb swimmers and divers, they can walk underwater along river and lake beds, much like a hippopotamus.

  • Large mammal found near rivers and lakes in the Amazon basin.
  • Long flexible nose grabs food such as leaves, fruit and grass.
  • Can hold its breath underwater for up to three minutes to escape predators.
S2 24 02

Whale Shark

(Rhincodon typus)

Gentle giant

Despite its enormous size (as long as a city bus) it poses no danger to humans and even allows divers and snorkelers to swim alongside it.

  • World’s largest fish, grows to more than 40ft (12m) in length.
  • Threatened by humans fishing for meat, oil and skins.
  • Found in oceans in tropical climates.
Series 1 Header

Series 1

Premier Series

The Premier Series marks the relaunch of Yowie and celebrates the six Yowie themselves, Rumble, Squish, Ditty, Boof, Crag and Nap, along with animals from all seven continents on our amazing planet: Asia, Africa, North America, South America, Antartica, Europe and of course, Australia! The beautiful and interesting animals in this first comeback collection range from the Endangered to Not Threatened and are animals found across the range of habitats that our Yowie friends watch over and protect: deserts, grasslands, plains, mountains, forests, warm water oceans, tropics, rivers and streams and even the frozen tundra. This collection was created to celebrate the conservation of ALL of the habitats on our wonderous planet, and the animals that call those habitats home.

Download The Poster
S1 Premier Series (19)

RUMBLE

The Redgum Yowie

Guardian of the Deserts and Plains. As the leader of the Yowie Pack, Rumble is an excitable, rough and tumble character. Cousin to the red kangaroo, Rumble is always ready to make a stand in defence of desert and plain. Inclined to be impatient, Rumble’s bark is far worse than its bite, and underneath there is a heart of gold.

S1 Premier Series (24)

SQUISH

The Fiddlewood Yowie

Guardian of the Waterways. Part playful platypus, Squish is as bubbly as a babbling brook, sparkling as a waterfall and contented as a slow flowing river. Protector of our waterways, Squish is always happy and energetic – the jester of the Yowie Pack and friend to all.

S1 Premier Series (23)

DITTY

The Lillipilli Yowie

Guardian of the Woodlands and Meadows. Ditty is the poet of the Yowie Pack. In love with its habitat and its wildfolk, Ditty spends time foraging with cousin wombat chasing butterflies and conducting cicada and cricket concerts. Always on the lookout for trouble in the woodlands and meadows, Ditty is a determined protector of its habitat.

S1 Premier Series (21)

BOOF

The Bottlebrush Yowie

Guardian of the Rainforest and Mountains. Ruler of its vast habitat of rainforests and mountains, Boof is delightfully unpredictable and the ever-funny clown of the Yowie Tribe. So brim full of joy, Boof is inclined to be a little clumsy as it trips among tree roots and toadstools with cousin bandicoot. But Boof is always around when needed to help friends and wildfolk.

S1 Premier Series (22)

CRAG

The Mangrove Yowie

Guardian of the Marshland, Swamps and Backwaters. With a touch of cousin crocodile, Crag is the meanest looking of all the Yowie. But behind that crocodilical smile, there beats a heart of gold. Vigilant keeper of marsh, swamp and backwater, Crag leaves nothing to chance when it comes to defending its habitat and all its wet and muddy creatures.

S1 Premier Series (20)

NAP

The Honeygum Yowie

Guardian of the Treetops. Nap is the wise old Yowie of the Pack. Most at home among the tree tops with the kookaburra, the owl, and kinfolk the koala family Nap’s wisdom and understanding are always available. A tendency to doze off at any time at all, caressed in dreams by breeze and gum blossom, doesn’t stop Nap from being an alert and able guardian of its lofty habitat.

S1 Premier Series (17)

African Grass Owl

(Tyto capensis)

Found: Eastern Africa, from Ethiopia to South Africa. 
Eats: Mice, rats and other small animals.
Conservation: Under pressure in some areas from farming and urban development. Often hunts near roads, so many are killed at night by cars and trucks.
Species status: Not threatened.

A nocturnal hunter of open, grassy habitats, the African Grass Owl uses its superb eyesight and powerful hearing to zero in on its prey, even in total darkness. The front edges of its large wings are covered in soft, comb-like feathers, which enable air to pass over them with a minimum of noise. This makes the owl’s flight almost completely silent, allowing it to swoop down on prey without warning.

S1 Premier Series (18)

Alpaca

(Vicugna pacos)

Found: Andes Mountains of South America.
Eats: Grasses
Conservation: Widespread as a domestic animal
Species status: Not threatened.

Renowned for its luxuriously soft wool, the Alpaca exists today only as a domestic animal. It is descended from the closely related Vicuña, a wild mammal of the high Andes mountains. The people of the Andes domesticated these animals thousands of years ago, breeding them selectively for their fine fleece. The Alpaca is notorious for its habit of spitting when agitated. This usually happens during disputes between Alpacas, although humans can occasionally become targets.

S1 Premier Series (5)

American Bison

(Bison bison)

Found: The Great Plains of North America.
Eats: Grasses and other low plants.
Conservation: Protected in reserves and national parks, numbers are growing.
Species status: Near threatened.

Also known as buffalo, American Bison once roamed the grasslands of North America in their millions. Hunting in the 19th century almost drove the species to extinction. Bison are well adapted to the extreme climate of the Great Plains, growing a heavy winter coat, then shedding it as summer approaches. Powerful runners, they can reach speeds of 40mph (65km/h) when fleeing predators, especially Gray Wolves.

S1 Premier Series (6)

Brown Bear

(Ursus arctos)

Found: Parts of Europe and the Middle East, northern Asia, north-western North America.
Eats: Roots, berries, acorns, mushrooms, mammals, fish.
Conservation: In some areas under pressure from habitat loss and hunting. 
Species status: Not threatened.

Brown Bears are highly adaptable animals capable of living in a wide variety of habitats. Although they have a ferocious reputation, they feed mainly on plants. They are especially fond of roots, digging them out of the earth with their powerful claws. Brown Bears also eat meat, which they obtain by either hunting or, more often, scavenging. They can also catch fish, scooping them out of the water or grabbing them with their teeth.

S1 Premier Series (7)

Caracal

(Caracal caracal)

Range: Africa, Middle East, Central Asia, northern India.
Eats: Small mammals, birds
Conservation: Under pressure in some areas from habitat loss and hunting.
Species status: Not threatened.

The Caracal is a medium-sized wild cat, recognizable by long tufts of hair on its ears. Well adapted to
dry conditions, it can go for long periods without drinking water, surviving on the fluids it digests from its prey. The Caracal is an acrobatic hunter, able to leap more than six and a half feet (2m) into the air to snatch birds in flight. As well as the usual feline noises such as purrs and growls, Caracals also communicate with barking sounds.

S1 Premier Series (2)

Clownfish

(Amphiprion ocellaris)

Found: Warm waters of the Indian and Pacific Oceans.
Eats: Small crustaceans, worms, plankton, algae. 
Conservation: Targeted by poachers for the pet trade. Coral reef habitat vulnerable to pollution and climate change. 
Species status: Near threatened.

While most small fish avoid sea anemones, the Clownfish is perfectly at home among their stinging tentacles. A coating of mucus protects the fish from the anemone’s venom. The Clownfish lays its eggs within the security of the anemone’s tentacles. In return for its safe home the little Clownfish aggressively fights off other fish, often much larger than itself, which might try to nip off the anemone’s soft tentacles.

S1 Premier Series (8)

Emperor Penguin

(Aptenodytes forsteri)

Found: Coastal Antarctica and nearby waters.
Eats: Fish, krill, squid.
Conservation: Faces potential threats from habitat disturbance and loss of prey due to overfishing.
Species status: Near threatened.

Up to four feet (120cm) tall and weighing up to 100lb (45kg), the Emperor Penguin is the largest
of all penguins. To survive in the frigid Antarctic habitat it has a thick layer of fat, and the densest coat of feathers of any bird. During winter male and female take turns to incubate a single egg. The other mate makes the long journey across the ice from the breeding colony to the open sea to hunt, returning to share its catch.

S1 Premier Series (4)

European Rabbit

(Oryctolagus cuniculus)

Found: Native to Spain, Portugal and northwest Africa. Introduced to many other countries. 
Eats: Grass, roots, leaves. 
Conservation: In its native range vulnerable to disease and overhunting.
Species status: Near threatened.

European Rabbits live in groups sharing networks of burrows called ‘warrens’. They can be highly aggressive, their muscular back legs making powerful weapons. Fights between males can be especially vicious, often leading to injury or death. Females are fiercely protective of their young, and will fight tenaciously to defend them. European Rabbits are constantly alert for danger, as they are important prey for many predators.

S1 Premier Series (1)

Fennec Fox

(Vulpes zerda)

Found: Sahara Desert of North Africa.
Eats: Small mammals, birds, insects.
Conservation: Hunted in some areas for its fur.
Species status: Not threatened.

Only about the size of a house cat, the Fennec Fox is the smallest member of the dog family. It is superbly adapted to the searing heat of its desert habitat. Its paws are covered in thick fur, protecting them from hot sand. The distinctive large ears help to keep the animal cool, acting as radiators for the blood. They also give the Fennec Fox excellent hearing, allowing it to detect prey hiding under the sand.

S1 Premier Series (10)

Galapagos Tortoise

(Chelonoidis nigra)

Found: Galapagos Islands (part of Ecuador, South America). 
Eats: Grasses, fruit, berries, cacti. 
Conservation: Threatened by habitat damage and predation of eggs and young by feral animals. 
Species status: Vulnerable.

Galapagos Tortoises are the world’s largest species of tortoise, sometimes reaching six feet (1.83m) in length and weighing as much as 880lb (400kg). They are among the longest lived of all animals and have been known to live for over 170 years. Galapagos Tortoises are voracious feeders, eating up to 80lb (36kg) of vegetation each day when food is readily available. Yet they can survive for over a year without food or water, living on fat reserves.

S1 Premier Series (9)

Giant Anteater

(Myrmecophaga tridactyla)

Found: Central and South America, from Honduras to northern Argentina.
Eats: Ants, termites and their eggs and larvae.
Conservation: Threatened by hunting, wildfires and habitat loss for ranching.
Species status: Vulnerable.

The Giant Anteater is found in a range of habitats, from grassland to rainforest. It has poor eyesight, but an excellent sense of smell, which it uses to locate the nests of ants and termites. Once it finds a nest, the Giant Anteater uses its powerful claws to rip it open. It then probes inside the exposed nest with its snout, licking up the insects with a long, sticky tongue that can extend as far as two feet (60cm).

S1 Premier Series (11)

Giant Panda

(Ailuropoda melanoleuca)

Found: Mountain ranges in central China.
Eats: Bamboo shoots.
Conservation: Threatened by habitat loss and poaching for skins.
Species status: Endangered.

The Giant Panda is an endangered bear found in the misty hills and mountains of central China. Although classified as a carnivore, it feeds almost entirely on bamboo shoots, eating up to 30lb (14kg) each day. The Panda’s digestive system contains special microbes that enable it to extract energy and nutrients from the tough bamboo. Each front paw has a specially modified bone that acts as a thumb, allowing the Panda to grasp the bamboo as it eats.

S1 Premier Series (16)

Gray Wolf

(Canis lupus)

Found: Parts of Europe, the Middle East, Africa, Asia and North America. 
Eats:
 Mainly large mammals, also small mammals, birds, reptiles.
Conservation: In some areas under pressure from habitat loss and hunting. 
Species status: Not threatened.

The Gray Wolf is a highly intelligent, social animal that lives in family groups called packs. Pack members communicate through complex facial expressions, as well as a variety of sounds including their well-known howling. Gray Wolves have great stamina and hunt large prey by tiring it out in long chases that can go for many miles. In spite of their bad reputation, attacks by Gray Wolves on humans are rare, as they usually avoid contact with people.

S1 Premier Series (13)

North American Beaver

(Castor canadensis)

Found: Rivers and streams in North America. 
Eats: Leaves and inner bark of trees.
Conservation: Beaver dam building causes occasional conflict with humans, leading to beavers being removed or destroyed. 
Species status: Not threatened.

The North American Beaver is famous for its dam building. The pond formed by the dam provides the animal with a safe place to build its home, or ‘lodge’. It also allows the beaver to swim to nearby trees, its main food source. Beaver dams create an important habitat for fish, waterfowl, otters and other animals. Once trapped in the millions for their fur, North American Beavers are now protected and their numbers are increasing.

S1 Premier Series (14)

Platypus

(Ornithorhynchus anatinus)

Found: Streams and rivers of eastern Australia.
Eats: Crayfish, shrimp, worms, insect larvae.
Conservation: Locally vulnerable to habitat loss and pollution.
Species status: Not threatened.

With its duck-like bill and beaver-like tail, the Platypus is one of the strangest of all mammals. It is one of only three species of egg-laying mammals. The Platypus feeds entirely underwater, using its supersensitive bill to detect electrical signals given off by prey. It does not open its eyes underwater, relying entirely on its bill to navigate and hunt. The male has sharp, venomous spurs on its hind feet, making it one of the world’s few venomous mammals.

S1 Premier Series (3)

Polar Bear

(Ursus maritimus)

Found: Arctic regions.
Eats: Seals, walruses, small whales.
Conservation: Threatened by loss of Arctic sea ice due to climate change.
Species status: Vulnerable.

The Polar Bear is a powerful predator of the icy Arctic. It feeds mainly on seals, which it usually hunts by lying in wait next to their breathing holes. When a seal surfaces for air, the bear seizes the prey with its sharp claws and crushing teeth. Polar Bears are excellent swimmers, and have been known to cross more than 200 miles (320km) of open sea. A thick layer of blubber protects them from the frigid water.

S1 Premier Series (12)

Southern Hairy-nosed Wombat

(Lasiorhinus latifrons)

Found: Arid areas of southern Australia.
Eats: Grasses, leaves.
Conservation: In some areas under pressure from habitat loss and competition for food from livestock. 
Species status: Not threatened.

The Southern Hairy-nosed Wombat is a large burrowing marsupial with powerful legs and strong claws for digging. Southern Hairy-nosed Wombats live in burrows joined together to form colonies, each of which can house up to ten animals. These colonies are like rabbit warrens, with multiple entrances and underground sleeping chambers. In the heat of summer the wombats stay in the cool of their burrows during the day, emerging to feed as the sun goes down.

S1 Premier Series (15)

Red Kangaroo

(Macropus rufus)

Found: Inland Australia.
Eats: Grasses, other low plants.
Conservation: Subject to commercial hunting and competition for food from livestock.
Species status: Not threatened.

The Red Kangaroo is the world’s largest marsupial. Males can stand nearly six feet (1.83m) in height.
Females are smaller, and often have bluish fur, giving them the nickname ‘blue flyers’. The young, known as ‘joeys’, stay in the mother’s pouch for about six months before venturing out. The Red Kangaroo is well adapted to its hot, dry habitat, usually resting in the shade during the heat of the day and feeding after sunset.

Nutritional Information
Free

Want to know more about the nutritional information of our product?

Yowie 1 (6)
Quality Safety
Quality And Safety

All Yowie collectibles are manufactured to international safety standards ensuring suitability for inclusion in a food product designed for children over 3 years. Each Yowie collectible has been hand painted with non-toxic, lead free, food grade paint for Yowie premium quality and safety. Each Yowie collectible has been detailed to exacting scientific specification and designed to replicate the animals appearance today as found in its own natural habitat. Each collectible comes with a fun facts information leaflet detailing the animal’s eco status.